Black Orient (Bulgari) | Fragrance Poetry

Fragrance Poetry inspired by Black Orient from Bulgari.

black orient bulgari fragrance review poetry
Photo by Peter John Maridable on Unsplash

Like leather laced with lava-lake,
I bit into the bitter bud.
It yanked my youth of yesterday
To Make a man from mud.

Riddled with resins and rum,
I swallowed the sachet of spice.
Once dredged and drained, was done,
Lifting this leper to life.

By fire, free-men are formed:
Chasten a cherished child.
Through tears and terrors, he’s torn.
But after smoke and smolder. . . he’ll smile.

I just wanted to say I had a lot of fun writing this one. I like to play around with difference styles of poetry, including free-form. But I threw a bunch of techniques in this one – rhyme, rhythm, alliteration and symbolism. A nice contrast from the one I wrote before this – “Wood Essence” – which was barely written as poetry. But hey, why not change things up?

Unfortunately, Black Orient from Bulgari was a limited run and now discontinued. So, my poem may be the only way you can ever experience it. Read Secret Garden from Aftelier. Β© TheFragranceWriter.com 2020, except where noted otherwise. All rights reserved.

Author: Jay Bleu

An Original Blend of Perfume and Poetry

51 thoughts on “Black Orient (Bulgari) | Fragrance Poetry”

    1. hahaha well when you put it like that! Btw I talked a lot about my new Aftelier samples on my blogs Instagram, but I’m assuming your blog isn’t on Instagram?

      Like

      1. Nah. I try to leave any reviews just for Insta, and WP just for my poetry. B) But I’ll copy and paste here the main parts where I was talking about the two most expensive ones.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. The thing that strikes me the most is… how much the ancient ambergris actually does smell like amber-woods. When you smell artificial ambergris [ambroxan] in something like the new dior homme or dylan blue (just to use examples that are easy to be familiar with), – obviously there is no comparison but you can really begin to understand where they were coming from in copying that note. Mandy mentioned in Fragrant that there are many types of Ambergris that smell different. Now I can really see the Ambergris/Amber-Woods connection. If you threw some Bergamot on-top, you’d have a modern masterpiece blend like so many popular ones today but… at a depth that can’t even be put into words.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Next thought. . I am so wowed my smelling the real osmanthus. I recently bought a commercial osmanthus fragrance. But with Parfum Prive on my arm… wow… it’s like having the actual flower there!

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Also I didn’t mention, but smelling authentic civet and castoreum (Cuir Gardenia seems to be a great example of Castoreum, and Secret Garden for the Civet) I was surprised how much I liked them. The artificial ones are much more cutting and unpleasant… just more fecal. The real ones can be that way more when spraying on paper, but on skin, the rough edges smooth out and your left with something more buttery or nutty and smooth

        Liked by 1 person

      5. And then finally for the Ouds, there is strong barnyard oud in Sepia. It is quite off putting. But the more I smell it, the more I like it or get addicted to it, like an acquired taste. I am nervous if I like it too much, I may start wearing it and driving everyone else around me crazy. One of her most famous ones, Momento Mori, always gets a strange smell on my skin (maybe at least partly responsible to the oud). But it gets a cheesy-butter facet. From what I’ve read, this seems to depend on your skin type. So not everyone get’s it. That fragrance is beautifully complicated and multi-faceted, other than the cheesy-butter that comes off of my skin

        Liked by 1 person

  1. (It yanked my youth of yesterday)

    Potent fusion of nature’s natural ingredients combined with synthetic chemistry (man-made made ingredients), so it can last longer, carry further and stay true.

    The joy is felt, I’m happy you found your aroma after the smoke and smolder, a beautiful and happy smile.

    The poetry lesson is a very valuable gem , thank you

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks I love your comment. B) I love this part you said “I’m happy you found your aroma after the smoke and smolder,”

      looks like you are learning a lot about fragrances, yourself!

      Like

      1. It’s good I feel so exhausted after doing something that uses to be normal like going to the mall. Not sure if I’m ready for quarantine to end LOL

        Like

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